UNZA Professor Says Bats in Zambia May Hold An Ebola Virus Cure

UNZA Professor Says Bats in Zambia May Hold An Ebola Virus Cure.

Bats in the fig trees of the kasanka national park in Northern Zambia have a high prevalence of Ebola anti-bodies and may hold a clue to a cure for the deadly virus, professor Aaron Mweene of the University of Zambia told Bloomberg.

About 10 million of the bats migrate from Congo to the Zambian park each year, to feed on the berries and figs found there, in what is the world’s second largest mammal migration, Aaron Mweene, professor at the University of Zambia’s veterinary medicine school, was quoted as saying by the news outlet.

Referring to recent research on the bats by scientists from Japan’s Hokkaido University, Professor Mweene added that the antibodies carried by the bats suggested that the mammals came into contact with the Ebola virus and were able to cure themselves.

Prior to this research on the bats in Zambia, Ebola antibodies in bats had been found only once before the Ghanaian capital, Accra, in 2008, as reported by the news outlet.

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