Kambwili Confronts Louise Linton Over Her Misleading Book About Zambia

Kambwili Confronts Louise Linton Over Her Misleading Book About Zambia.

Chief Government Spokesman Chishimba Kambwili has asked Scottish Actress Louise Linton to retract her article promoting her book in which she described Zambia as a war torn country with children ravaged with HIV.

In an interview Dr Kambwili said the article and Ms. Linton’s book titled ‘In Congo’s Shadow’ does not portray the true picture of the Zambian situation.

He said he will soon be engaging the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to see how Government can get Ms Linton to apologise to Zambia publicly over what he called misleading articles about Zambia.
Dr Kambwili said it is incorrect to paint Zambia as a war ravaged country when the country is known world over as a beacon of peace.

He said Ms Linton’s write up is simply a fragment of her wild imagination.

“We are very disappointed that the young lady was hosted in this country and she ended up painting a bad picture of our beautiful country in her write up. It is very unfortunate and we will ask her to retract her write up and apologise,” Dr Kambwili said.

He added, “She is a very irresponsible person and whoever gave her that information must apologise to Zambians. That writing is in bad faith and the source is not legitimate, we are extremely disappointed as Government and we will be engaging the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to get an apologise.”

Zambians took to social media to highlight factual errors in Ms. Linton’s self-published memoir about her gap-year in Zambia.

The Twitter storm broke out after excerpts of the book, In Congo’s Shadow were published on July 1 in the British Newspaper The Telegraph.

The hashtag being used is #LintonLies.

In the book, which came out in April, Ms. Linton waxes poetic about her trip to the continent nearly two decades ago.

Ms. Linton later tweeted a short statement in response to the criticism.

“I wrote this book with the hope of conveying my deep humility, respect and appreciation for the people of Zambia and my sincere hope of making a positive impact there as an 18-year-old volunteer in 1999. I speak at length about the country’s incredible beauty and my immense gratitude for the friendships and experiences I had there. My aim has only ever been to honour Zambia.”

She wrote: “I am genuinely dismayed and very sorry to see that I have offended people as this was the very opposite of my intent. “I wrote with the hope of conveying my deep humility, respect and appreciation for the people of Zambia as an 18yr old in 1999. “I wrote about the country’s incredible beauty and my immense gratitude for the experiences I had there.”

Linton’s father, William Hay, today defended her account.

And Linton’s father has defended William Hay has defended his daughter’s account.

Mr Hay who runs the Edinburgh-based family business, said: “As far as I can remember of what she said on her return that was the situation.

“The place was raided. I think the gamekeeper was shot dead.

“They trekked into the bush a bit and I got a phone call when she got to the nearest phone.”

Discussing the lodge and area Linton was staying, he said it was a “primitive hotel” which “was certainly not a sophisticated environment”.

He denied allegations that her book degrades Zambians by painting her as a “white saviour”, saying: “She had great respect for them.”

Mr Hay did, however, suggest that the manuscript of the book was changed by the publisher “and she was not happy with the story”.

He added: “She was really quite disappointed and quite embarrassed.”

 

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